Bat Walks at Charlecote

We’ve another bat walk taking place next month (11 September 2015). They’re always very popular so we’d recommend that you book quickly to secure your place! The walks are led by a member of the Warwickshire Bat Group along with a member of our property team. We have bat detectors on hand to help find the little creatures but do recommend you bring a torch!

On the last bat walk three species of bat were identified – the Common Pipistrelle, the Noctule and the Daubenton’s bat.

Pipistrelles are the bats that you are most likely to see. They appear fast and jerky in flight as they dodge about pursuing mall insects which the bats catch and eat on the wing. A single pipistrelle can consume up to 3,000 insects in one night.

Common pipistrelle bat {Pipistrellus pipistrellus} flying at night, captive, UK. ©National Trust Images/NaturePL/Andy Sands

Common pipistrelle bat {Pipistrellus pipistrellus} flying at night, captive, UK.
©National Trust Images/NaturePL/Andy Sands

Daubenton’s bat is a medium-sized species. It has a steady flight, often within a few centimetres of the water surface where it catches insects.

Daubenton's bat hunting insects over water {Myotis daubentoni} ©National Trust Images/NaturePL/Dietmar Nill

Daubenton’s bat hunting insects over water {Myotis daubentoni} ©National Trust Images/NaturePL/Dietmar Nill

The Noctule bat is one of the largest British species and is usually the first bat to appear in the evening, sometimes even before sunset. Noctules have broad brown eats and a distinctive mushroom shaped tragus. They have a characteristic powerful, direct flight on narrow pointed wings. They fly in the open, often well above the tree-top level with repeated steep dives when chasing insects.

Natterer's bat (Myotis natteren) hanging on tree trunk. ©National Trust Images/Bat Conservation Trust/Hugh Clark

Natterer’s bat (Myotis natteren) hanging on tree trunk.
©National Trust Images/Bat Conservation Trust/Hugh Clark

I wonder what we’ll discover on our next bat walk…

For more info head over to the events page of our website.

To find out more about UK bat species and to hear what they sound like, visit the Bat Conservation Trust website which is full of very useful information.

 

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